Stroke affecting more young people

Many people in Texas think of stroke as a disease affecting the elderly. While it is true that those 75 and older make up the majority of stroke victims, there are a growing number of young people who suffer from the condition. First, it’s important to understand that the risk factors for stroke can be found in both the young and old.

Those risk factors include high blood pressure, obesity, diabetes and smoking. Obesity, in particular, is becoming more widespread, and it’s associated with diabetes and high blood pressure. Thirty-five percent of adults aged 20 to 39 and 42% of adults aged 40 to 59 are classified as obese.

Young people are also smoking e-cigarettes and recreational marijuana more. In addition, among people under the age of 45, heavy weight lifting and movements that strain the neck can tear the lining of a blood vessel and put them at risk for an ischemic stroke. Another condition that could cause stroke in the young is patent foramen ovale: a hole in the heart that never closed properly after birth. It can be found in one in four people.

Pregnant women with high blood pressure and gestational diabetes are much more likely to suffer stroke. Experts say that black women in their 50s run triple the risk for stroke compared to white women in their 50s.

Stroke victims are often misdiagnosed; women, for example, may be thought of as suffering from classic migraines. Under medical malpractice law, diagnostic errors that are the result of medical negligence can form the basis for a claim. Victims may be compensated for their pain and suffering, the medical treatments they underwent and any wages lost as a result. For help with filing their claim, victims may want to hire a lawyer to negotiate on their behalf.