Teens and seniors drive in older, unsafe vehicles

In Texas and across the U.S., teens and adults 65 and older both tend to drive vehicles that are older, smaller and less safe. This was the finding of a large-scale study conducted by a team of researchers at the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia. The journal Traffic Injury Prevention published the results in August 2020.

Teens and seniors, the most at-risk drivers

Researchers looked at all the car crashes that occurred in the state of New Jersey between 2010 and 2017. With the VIN of every vehicle involved, researchers determined what a vehicle’s age and other characteristics were. This included information on whether a vehicle had safety features like side and curtain airbags as well as electronic stability control, or ESC.

The study showed that because teens and adults over 65 tend to drive older vehicles, they do not have the benefit of driving with ESC and side and curtain airbags. ESC is especially important because it keeps a vehicle under control when drivers take sharp turns or travel on slippery roads. Of all age groups, teens and seniors are already the most at risk for car accidents.

Finding a safe car within one’s budget

Budgetary restraints naturally contribute to this trend. Researchers encourage everyone to find the safest vehicle possible under these limitations; they say that many safe vehicles can be purchased for less than $7,000.

A lawyer for personal attention

Victims of car accidents may feel that they have nowhere to turn as they deal with the long-term effects of their injuries: lingering pain, the need for rehabilitative care and a diminished capacity to earn a living. You may seek compensation for your injuries if the other driver was clearly responsible. A lawyer and a team of investigators and other third parties may help you file the claim and negotiate a settlement.